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Epiphany 1 – Luke 2:41-52

by pastorjuhl ~ January 28th, 2014

In the Name of the Father and of the + Son and of the Holy Spirit

The greater majority of the Gospels focus on three years of the thirty-three years Jesus Christ lived among us. Where are the other thirty years? You would think that someone would have written an exhaustive account of the life of Jesus Christ as the God-man. More biographical accounts of what Jesus said and did, especially in His younger years, perhaps would make for a more believable God.

All we receive about Jesus before the age of thirty is that He was born, was visited by wise men around the age of one, fled to Egypt and then to Nazareth in Galilee some time later, and then went with His parents to Jerusalem to celebrate Passover at the age of twelve. The rest of Jesus’ life with His parents is summarized in one verse: And Jesus increased in wisdom and in stature and in favor with God and man.

All sorts of false gospels proclaim phony stories about Jesus’ childhood. Have you heard the one about Jesus raising one of His playmates from the dead? Or maybe Jesus grabbing a hunk of dirt, fashioning a bird out of the dirt, blowing on the dirt bird, and the bird comes to life and flies out of His hand? There are all sorts of stories you can find about “the missing years” of our Lord’s life on earth. What’s important, what is truly inspired by God, about Jesus’ life is that He increased in wisdom and in stature and in favor with God and man. In other words, Jesus’ childhood, outside of this one event in Luke chapter two, is mundane…maybe even boring. He obeyed God and His parents, in that order.

A lot of good comes from that obedience to His heavenly Father and His earthly parents. This seems not to be the case when they all go to Jerusalem for Passover. Mary and Joseph are heading back to Nazareth with a group. They get twenty or so miles outside Jerusalem when the worst thing that could happen to them happens. Jesus stayed behind in Jerusalem. His parents did not know it. Today an event like this would get you in trouble with the Department of Children and Family Services. What sort of parents are Joseph and Mary? They are not able to keep track of a twelve-year-old boy. They assume He is among their group. Yet He is not there!

They return to Jerusalem and search for three days. When they do find Jesus, He is in the temple listening to the doctors of the Law and asking questions. It’s as if Jesus is attending catechism instruction, but who is instructing whom? Seems as if Jesus is the one doing the instructing. All who heard Him were amazed at His understanding and His answers.

At first glance, this account seems to be a “gotcha”. How can Jesus be obedient to His parents when He abandons them and stays behind in Jerusalem to hear and talk to the teachers in the temple? An obedient child would have been right by His parents’ side. There would be no frantic three-day search in a large city looking for Him. The difficult thing for us to believe about this account is that Jesus is obedient to His heavenly Father and His earthly parents at the same time.

How is this so? It is so because Jesus is, above all things, obedient to His heavenly Father. This is why Jesus is surprised when His parents scold Him about disappearing from them. Our Lord responds, Why were you looking for me? Did you not know that I must be in my Father’s house? Another way to say it is, Did you not know that I must be in the place where My Father is? The heavenly Father dwells in the temple. There the Word of the Law and the prophets reigns supreme. Jesus must be where this Word dwells. He is there not only to hear it, but also learn from it and, when necessary, to correct earthly teachers about what that Word says about Him.

Here we recall the third commandment about preaching and the Word of God. Jesus gladly hears and learns from the Word, even as He is the Word made flesh. Our thoughts and prayers about the Word are soiled in sin. Even when we gladly hear and learn the Word, we still want our itching ears scratched. Perhaps this is why we love to hear stories about so-called Biblical scholars finding new evidence about Jesus that contradicts what Scripture says. This is also why we tend to trust our own thoughts and opinions about God’s Word, especially when it proclaims the free, full forgiveness of sins because of Jesus Christ. We are always on the lookout for something new, something that sets us apart from others.

Though Jesus amazed those who saw Him listening and questioning, it should not amaze us that this is the extraordinary Savior doing something quite ordinary. He is about His Father’s business, just as He would be almost two decades later. He is about His Father’s business by being submissive to His parents. Our sinful selfish nature only cares about ourselves. Jesus, on the other hand, did as He was told by His earthly parents. But what about this incident? He seems to run off and do His own thing. Not so. We must obey God rather than men. His first priority, our first priority, is to hear preaching and the Word of God. Then comes submission to our neighbor. Where these two things are in conflict, submission to God’s Word always comes first.

We fail in both realms of submission. We choose other words over God’s Word. We care about our own self rather than our neighbor. Where we fall short, Jesus does not fall short. His perfect obedience is for our sake. By God’s merciful grace, through faith in His Son Jesus Christ, we receive the benefits of our Lord’s unfailing obedience to both His heavenly Father and His earthly mother and father. When Jesus is about His Father’s business, when He is where His Father is, He is there for us, doing what He is given to do in order to redeem mankind.

His is an extraordinary life wrapped in ordinary flesh. One minute He confounds people in the Jerusalem temple. The next minute He fetches carpentry tools for Joseph and perhaps helps Mary clean up after supper. When our submission to God and to neighbor fails, Christ’s submission to both never fails on our behalf. In Him there is forgiveness and life, even when that life seems all too mundane. Once again, God is at work in the little things of life. In the little things, in hearkening to the Word of God, in water, in bread and wine, there are great things, even forgiveness of sins and perfect righteousness.

Blesséd be the Lord, the God of Israel, Who alone does wondrous things.

 In the Name of the Father and of the + Son and of the Holy Spirit

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